The Anatomical Perspective of Rock-Solid Nutrition

In my upcoming book, I detail 10 different perspectives on why plant-based nutrition is superior. The premise behind this particular perspective is supremely logical. When we step back and analyze the notion of optimal nourishment from a sheer physiological point of view, the human anatomy seems clearly designed for a plant-based diet.

Consider these facts:

• Upon close examination of our digestive system, you’ll find a 29-foot intestinal tract. We share this elongated design with other herbivores so that we may enjoy a gradual absorption of our plant-based foods in the digestion process. Carnivores have a short digestive tract so that the rapidly-putrefying flesh can make a quick exit.

• The stomach acid of a carnivore, which was obviously intended to accommodate the denser materials of their diet, is 20 times stronger than ours.

• Our jaw and teeth structure, like other herbivores, is clearly designed for the grinding and chewing action required for eating fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, seeds and nuts. But a carnivore has some serious fangs (much sharper, longer, and bigger than our own “canines”) and a jaw that operates in a vertical fashion for the gnawing and tearing of hide and flesh.

• Carnivores appear to have zero predisposition for atherosclerosis, regardless of how much cholesterol or saturated fat they consume in the form of animal flesh. This implies that they have a naturally efficient way of assimilating flesh foods (due largely, it seems, to the high amount of bile their livers produce). Humans, who are obviously more like herbivores, clearly do not.

• Our hands were designed to pick things from trees and bushes or pull things from the ground, not rip and tear like the hooves and claws of carnivorous animals.

• Furthermore, our raw physical capabilities, which include our reflexes, total land speed (running in open fields or jumping and leaping through rough terrain), overall strength to attack and kill most of the animals we eat, etc., are woefully inadequate to play a predatory role.

Although we have the capacity to eat flesh foods without keeling over (immediately, at least), it would seem that this is more of a last resort, emergency survival mechanism, than an optimal directive for us to follow. And as I’ll continue to prove around here, our bodies are far more ideally designed for a plant-based diet, both in theory and practice.

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About Bobby Rock

Bobby Rock is a world renown drummer, the author of seven books, and a recognized health and fitness specialist with certifications in exercise, nutrition and meditation. He has recorded and toured with a variety of artists, released three CDs as a solo performer and is recognized as a top drumming educator. (He is currently touring with rock icon, Lita Ford.) Through speaking, writing and activism, Bobby remains committed to a number of animal and environmental causes. Bobby lives in Los Angeles.
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3 Responses to The Anatomical Perspective of Rock-Solid Nutrition

  1. Lisamarie says:

    Oh that sounds soooo intersting!! Is that going to be in the Rock Solid book, and when do you think it’ll be out?

  2. Bobby Rock says:

    Yes, that’s all part of the book, and I’m sure it will be out in some form or another in 08. I’ve been working on this damn thing daily!

  3. Lisamarie says:

    Cool–need some help? 😉

    Thanks for your response here and on MySpace. Hope I didn’t annoy you too much with all the messages and I’ll try to leave you alone now for a while, ok?
    Have a good Christmas. Happy New Year–Lisamarie.

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